Friendly probiotic bacteria
A close up of Saccharomyces Boulardii which is a friendly yeast which is used to treat fungal/Candida overgrowth

As contradictory as it sounds, one of the most beneficial supplements to take for Candida is a yeast called Saccharomyces Boulardii (S. boulardii).

As contradictory as it sounds, one of the most beneficial supplements to take for Candida is a yeast called Saccharomyces Boulardii (S. boulardii).

Its a non-colonizing yeast which means that it will travel through your gut. How it acts is when it passes through the gut it stimulates the gut’s production of an immune component called secretory IgA. When we have bigger amounts of the immune protein in our guts, makes it difficult for unfriendly bacteria and Candida to stick to your gut wall and proliferate. Essentially, it’s making the environment of our gut more unhospitable to Candida and increasing our own friendly bacteria to outnumber the Candida.

Antibiotics and Saccharomyces Boulardii

As we are seeing from new research the importance of gut health, we know we need to limit any damage when we take antibiotics and there is definitely research to show that taking probiotics at the same time will limit damage and help replace those bacteria that are destroyed on the course. Whereas with Saccharomyces Boulardii, because it’s a yeast, it’s unaffected by antibiotics. Antibiotics only kills bacteria which means you can take Saccharomyces Boulardii at exactly the same time as the antibiotics.

A very good strategy whilst taking antibiotics is take Saccharomyces Boulardii during and after which will make it more difficult for any opportunistic pathogenic bacteria and yeasts to take up residence. It’s being recommended that a dose of between 500 to 1000mg daily for adults and up to 500mg for kids to be an effective dose whilst taking antibiotics.

 

Choosing the right Saccharomyces Boulardii product.

Like and product, not all products are equal and the same rings true with Saccharomyces Boulardii. Like other probiotic strains, in general, you get what you pay for.

With Saccharomyces Boulardii, they come in two forms, either heat dried or lyophilized (freeze dried). The difference being is that you don’t need to refrigerate the lyophilized product, as they are stable at room temperature and they don’t lose their potency.

It’s being shown that lyophilized forms of Saccharomyces Boulardii are a lot more potent and are of higher quality. What you should be looking for are products that have a preparation of 250mg with a minimum of 5 Million live colonies.

MOS + FOS

The other product to be mindful of when taking Saccharomyces Boulardii is both Fructooligosaccharides (FOS) and Mannan oligosaccarides (MOS). FOS and MOS are prebiotics and occur naturally in plants such as onion, chicory, garlic, asparagus, and artichoke. They are fermentable fibres that can’t by digested by humans but are food for our microbes, such as the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species with which we are host to.

These non-digestible food sources have a positive influence on us by stimulating growth of bacteria. By stimulating growth of bacteria, they will enhance our microbiome. This occurs through heightened mucus production and therefore improved conditions of the intestinal tissue increasing the absorption of nutrients. However, this type of strategy is best employed when you are parasite free. If you use products that have either FOS or MOS, then you have a good chance of fueling the fire, so to speak, as your feeding them a form of sugar and potentially making your condition worse, so be sure as to ALWAYS read the labels carefully with products that have MOS of FOS. This applies not just to Saccharomyces Boulardii but to your standard probiotics, too.

References

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19732158

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19732158

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20706577

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20629753

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18627477

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19706150

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17767461

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20629753